Train to Hunt & RevoMT

Train to Hunt

We have under 90 days until general deer/elk season!

How are your quads feeling about hiking in the woods and hauling that deer out? We want to help you have a good hunting season by helping you get ready for it.

Train to succeed. Training for the hunt should reflect the hunt. That’s why Venery is partnering with RevoMT to launch a 6 week Hunt Prep Class and Program.

RevoMT Hunt Prep Course

6 WEEKS of two classes per week
HANDS-ON COACHING and programming
CUSTOMIZED to prepare you to perform in the back country
AEROBIC DEVELOPMENT to be done on the mountain or in the gym to ensure you stay alert and capable no matter the conditions

We have a class/program ready to launch to prepare for hunt season specifically, improving overall fitness and work capacity so that the Montana hunter can go further, maintain high energy levels, and stay resilient and composed in any situation. The design is two strength classes a week, and a written aerobic work program (mostly rucking/hiking with other stuff done in our classes) to do additional days of the week. Because smoke season is approaching, we are going to open up the option to hunt prep attendees to pop into some of our conditioning classes during the week for aerobic work in case the smoke gets bad in the following weeks.

Classes run August 13th-September 24th – Limited space available to ensure quality coaching. Mention Venery when you contact Mike@RevoMT.com to sign up and join us as we Become Stronger and Go Further!

Where to Start . . . permits

Interested in hunting, but don’t know where to start? Join Venery and our friends from Artemis Sportswomen for an introduction to the permit process – we’ll sort through the regulations together and help answer your questions – no experience necessary!

WHAT: Permit Potluck Party
(Bring hot soup, stew, dish to share. Venery will provide sides and dessert)

WHEN: March 12, 5:30pm – 6:30pm

WHERE: Missoula Public Library – Large Meeting Room

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Time

by Alex 

There’s a progression of activities that lead to a successful hunt. Take scouting for example.

I really do want to be out scouting. Hiking the areas I want to hunt before the season opens. Looking for rub marks on the trees. Seeing where the deer are eating and bedding down. It’s definitely an important part of the hunt. Not to mention breaking in my boots and actually getting some exercise to be in shape for hunting season.

What I struggle with is when, not as in the time of year, but when am I, a working mother of 3, supposed to find time (and energy) to actually fit that into my life?

Why do I feel so guilty scheduling a day to be in the woods? Or planning a weekend here or there for hunting? I don’t often put my desires above the needs of my family. Maybe they would buy it if I said I was “doing it for them.”  A successful hunt would put food on the table and in the freezer.  Don’t get me wrong, there are other benefits too: I get exercise, I enjoy nature. These activities recharge me – that’s good for the family, right?

Hunting like any other pursuit takes time, practice and commitment. What I’m realizing is I actually need to prioritize hunting- Hunting is personal. I do it for me. And, there is nothing wrong with that. All too often I do things for the benefit of other people.

So, this year, here is my plan –

  1. Communicate with my family – let them know how important hunting is to me
  2. Set Boundaries – make time for myself.
  3. Prioritize Hunting – set a series of dates for scouting, shooting practice, and hunting
  4. Be Grateful – for any time I am able to spend preparing and actually hunting

It’s the brief moments of time in between carpools, volunteering at school, and managing kids sports that I make count when I can. I am getting better at it as the kids get older and are more self sufficient. I’m passionate about hunting, there’s no doubt about that. It is a heritage that I have brought to my family, in spite of my family and because of my family. I believe in conservation, food from the source, and communing with nature. So I’m choosing to align a piece of my time and energy for what I believe in.

Yes- I’m a busy woman; wife, mother, employee, volunteer and hunter-  and Yes- I need time for myself.

Permit Party – potluck

Join Venery on March 13 for an evening to plan your 2018 hunt.
We’ll guide you through the permit request process and help you apply for the tags you want.


WHO: Anyone interested in hunting – family friendly

WHEN: March 13 from 6-8pm

WHEREImagine Nation Brewery

Please RSVP to venerymt@gmail.com

WHY: We know navigating the regulations can be confusing, so we’ll help each other through and maybe find some new hunting buddies along the way. Our goal is to expose, educate, and inspire women into hunting, where we learn and grow together towards better health and awareness.

WHAT: Winter Potluck Theme – hot soups and spicy stews: Some great dishes that can be prepared for a winter potluck are butternut risotto, vegetable soup with corn dumplings, beef noodle soup, chicken and barley stew and Moroccan chickpea chili.

Venery will provide accoutrements, dessert, and place settings.

 

 

Teaching yourself to hunt

Learning to hunt as an adult can be difficult. While you need and want mentors, you have to take ownership over your learning in a way that you didn’t need to when you were 10. Oftentimes, it feels like you are teaching yourself how to hunt. In many ways you are because you need to make sense of things with your adult brain and your adult relationships.

Two years ago, my friend Sarah and I decided to teach ourselves how to hunt antelope. We’d both hunted and killed deer before, but we really had no idea how to nab a speed goat. That first year, we engaged in behavior that would have frustrated many people in my life to no end. We sat on the side of the road for 15 minutes strategizing our approach. We hemmed. We hawed. We debriefed for hours. We came home empty handed.

After our second year out, here are some things I’ve learned about teaching myself to hunt:

  1. It’s hard to find the time. Really hard. Work, family, and other things in life get in the way. We put in for area 700 and decided to hunt the Brodaus/Alzeda triangle. It’s 7 hours away, and our hunting trip was seriously shortened by the travel distance. You don’t have to be crazy like us, but, if you’re in Missoula, you’ll need to do some traveling if you want to hunt with a rifle. Take a day if you can, but if you have four hours, take four hours. You don’t have to commit to a week. Commit to what you can.
  2. Experienced hunters can tell you the same thing in a million different ways but it won’t make sense until it does.  As a teacher, one of my favorite sayings is you can’t teach anybody anything, you can only create opportunities for learning.  Opportunities for learning only happen in the field. Be smart and be safe, but get out there because you can’t learn how to hunt from a book.
  3. Experiential learning is best when you have someone to debrief with, strategize with, and laugh with. So, grab a buddy. It doesn’t matter if they know more, less or the same amount. What matters is that they support you the way you need and want to be supported. (It’s a bonus if they still think you’re funny after 3 days in a truck!)
  4. Call a friend. Sometimes, you just need to ask someone who knows. Find an experienced hunter who doesn’t mind if you call them at 7:00am with a question about the difference between BLM land and BMA land. Find someone who won’t laugh or get frustrated when you ask the same question for the tenth time as you struggle to make sense of it. Put that person’s number in your phone. (FYI, Alex and I will volunteer for that position!)

The cooler is still empty this year. We both had antelope in our scopes, which is more than we could say last year. For our own reasons, we decided not to pull the trigger.  I could tell you why, but I’m not going to because hunting is a little bit like sex. If it doesn’t feel right, it doesn’t feel right. If you don’t want to, you don’t want to. And you never have to offer an explanation.

We learned a lot this year. We had a lot of fun. And are excited to try again next season.

SarahEderer.Antelope2017
Glassing at sunrise.